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February 14, 2017-February 16, 2017

Associate member conference: Cátedra de Estudios sobre Canadá (CES), Universidad de La Habana

October 28, 2016-September 29, 2016

Associate member conference: Canadian Studies Network

October 01, 2016-October 01, 2016

Associate member conference: The Korean Association for Canadian Studies

May 19, 2016-May 21, 2016

Associate member conference: Polish Association for Canadian Studies

May 09, 2015-May 09, 2015

Associate member conference: Association for Canadian Studies in China

November 22, 2013

BEST DOCTORAL THESIS IN CANADIAN STUDIES

This ICCS Award is designed to recognize and promote each year an outstanding PhD thesis on a Canadian topic, written by a member (or one of his/her students) of a Canadian Studies Association or Associate Member, and which contributes to a better understanding of Canada.

November 22, 2013

PUBLISHING FUND

The International Council for Canadian Studies (ICCS) has established the ICCS Publishing Fund to assist with the publication and distribution in Canada of scholarly monographs on Canada written by foreign Canadianists who are members of a Canadian Studies Association or Associate Member belonging to the International Council for Canadian Studies. This fund assists foreign Canadianists by granting financial aid to a recognized scholarly press once the work is published.
November 22, 2013

GOVERNOR GENERAL'S INTERNATIONAL AWARD IN CANADIAN STUDIES

The Governor General's International Award for Canadian Studies is intended for a scholar who has made an outstanding contribution to scholarship and to the development of Canadian Studies internationally.
November 22, 2013

PIERRE SAVARD AWARDS

The Pierre Savard Awards are designed to recognize and promote each year outstanding scholarly monographs on a Canadian topic.
July 01, 2013-July 03, 2013

Emotion, Space and Indigenous Populations

The Fourth International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Emotional Geographies
Many interpretations of the term “postcolonial” neglect the fact that, before the arrival of Europeans, there were pre-existent traditions/cultures in former colonies such as Canada, Australia and South-Africa. In many cases, the word postcolonial thus primarily serves to reinforce the legacy of colonization. As an alternative, Native Canadian novelist Thomas King proposes a non-centred method to include locally identified and marginal voices by presenting new descriptors that avoid privileging one culture over another. Offering terms such as “tribal”, “interfusional”, “polemical” and “associational” (1990, 186) to describe the range of indigenous writing, King identifies “vantage points from which we can see a particular literary landscape” (1990, 186).
In this session, new vantage points are explored to study not only literary but also cultural, anthropological, geographical, social and other landscapes in which Indigenous communities are living today. Land and/or territory are not only crucial for the survival of Indigenous peoples, but they also have a symbolic meaning for many communities that do not live on their ancestral land. In order to discuss the emotional effects of recent developments such as migration and urbanisation of Indigenous peoples, it is essential to reflect on representations of space and on the relationship between identity and physical and social environment.
In this interdisciplinary session we welcome papers that discuss spatial knowledge of Indigenous communities and their culturally distinct understanding of landscape through the concept of participatory mapping, that identify and explore Indigenous heritage places, that examine geopolitical issues and Indigenous governance, that focus on land boundaries and border crossings from a wide range of perspectives and within a variety of domains such as Arctic studies, anthropology, cultural and social geography, literary and minority studies.Many interpretations of the term “postcolonial” neglect the fact that, before the arrival of Europeans, there were pre-existent traditions/cultures in former colonies such as Canada, Australia and South-Africa. In many cases, the word postcolonial thus primarily serves to reinforce the legacy of colonization. As an alternative, Native Canadian novelist Thomas King proposes a non-centred method to include locally identified and marginal voices by presenting new descriptors that avoid privileging one culture over another. Offering terms such as “tribal”, “interfusional”, “polemical” and “associational” (1990, 186) to describe the range of indigenous writing, King identifies “vantage points from which we can see a particular literary landscape” (1990, 186).
In this session, new vantage points are explored to study not only literary but also cultural, anthropological, geographical, social and other landscapes in which Indigenous communities are living today. Land and/or territory are not only crucial for the survival of Indigenous peoples, but they also have a symbolic meaning for many communities that do not live on their ancestral land. In order to discuss the emotional effects of recent developments such as migration and urbanisation of Indigenous peoples, it is essential to reflect on representations of space and on the relationship between identity and physical and social environment.
In this interdisciplinary session we welcome papers that discuss spatial knowledge of Indigenous communities and their culturally distinct understanding of landscape through the concept of participatory mapping, that identify and explore Indigenous heritage places, that examine geopolitical issues and Indigenous governance, that focus on land boundaries and border crossings from a wide range of perspectives and within a variety of domains such as Arctic studies, anthropology, cultural and social geography, literary and minority studies.





April 26, 2012-April 27, 2012

Associate member conference:

International Council for Canadian Studies
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